Study: Hormone Therapy Can Prevent Miscarriages

Study: Hormone Therapy Can Prevent Miscarriages

According to two studies, giving the hormone progesterone to pregnant women who have had early bleeding and a history of miscarriage may boost the likelihood of a healthy delivery and result in 8,450 additional infants being delivered each year in the UK alone.
The first study examined the benefits, both scientific and financial, of providing women with a course of self-administered progesterone in the form of pessaries, a tiny, soluble block put into the vagina. The study was published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.


The pessaries are given to women when they first exhibit early pregnancy bleeding up to 16 weeks of pregnancy, according to the researchers, who include those from the University of Birmingham in the UK, in order to avoid miscarriage.
They described how progesterone, a hormone that the ovaries and placenta naturally release in the early stages of pregnancy, is essential for achieving and maintaining healthy pregnancies.
In the studies, the researchers presented the results of the PROMISE and PRISM clinical trials, two significant investigations.
Progesterone was shown to be associated with a 3% higher live birth rate, albeit with significant statistical uncertainty, in the PROMISE study of 836 women who had had repeated, unexplained miscarriages at 45 hospitals in the UK and the Netherlands.
Contrarily, the PRISM study of 4,153 women with early pregnancy bleeding at 48 hospitals in the UK discovered a 5% increase in the number of babies born to those who received progesterone compared to those who received a placebo. These babies were all born to mothers who had previously experienced one or more miscarriages.
Among comparison to the placebo group, the progesterone therapy increased the live birth rate by 15% in women who had previously had recurrent miscarriages.
The second paper assesses the PRISM trial's economics and was published in BJOG: an international journal of obstetrics and gynecology.
It was determined that progesterone, which typically requires 204 pounds each pregnancy, is cost-effective.
According to Adam Devall, Senior Clinical Trial Fellow at the University of Birmingham, "between 20 and 25% of pregnancies terminate in a miscarriage, which has a severe clinical and psychological effect on women and their families."
A long-standing research topic is: "What function does first trimester progesterone supplementation play in the management of pregnancies with a high risk of miscarriage?
The progesterone therapy may be advantageous for women who have had one or more prior miscarriages in addition to early pregnancy bleeding, according to the study.
According to Arri Coomarasamy, professor of gynecology at the University of Birmingham, "our recommendation is to take into account providing a course of treatment of progesterone 400 milligrams twice daily to women with early pregnancy bleeding and a history of one or more previous miscarriages, started at the time of presentation with vaginal bleeding and continued until 16 completed weeks of gestation."
We predict that applying this treatment plan in the UK will lead to an extra 8,450 live births per year, he added.