A 60-year-old man of the Ahmadiyya community was stabbed to death in broad daylight in Pakistan's Punjab province, accused arrested

A 60-year-old man of the Ahmadiyya community was stabbed to death in broad daylight in Pakistan's Punjab province, accused arrested

Cases of persecution of the Ahmadiyya community in Pakistan keep coming to the fore day by day. The latest case is of Chenabnagar city of Punjab province. A 60-year-old man from an Ahmadiyya community has been stabbed to death here. Dawn newspaper quoted a police officer as saying that the incident took place when Naseer Ahmed and his brother Munir were going shopping in the morning.

A 60-year-old man died at the scene

An unidentified person standing at the Chenabnagar bus stand stopped them and questioned them about their religion, the police official said. Police said the suspect took out a dagger from his bag and attacked Ahmed. Due to this, he died on the spot. Police said the locals caught the suspect who tried to escape and handed him over to the police.

The victim's brother claims - the accused raised slogans after the murder

Please tell that the deceased was a resident of Darul Rehmat Sharqi near Rabwah of Chenabnagar. He is survived by his wife and three daughters. The victim's brother Munir told Dan that the suspect had attacked him on religious grounds and raised slogans in favor of Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan (TLP). He said the suspect also raised slogans praising the late Khadim Hussain Rizvi, the founder of TLP.

Atrocities against the Ahmadiyya community increased in Pakistan

Significantly, the Pakistani government has failed to protect the human rights and security of the Ahmadiyya community. Ahmadis are banned from publicly proclaiming or promoting their religion, as well as from building mosques or calling for prayer by Muslims. Earlier, Pakistan Muslim League-Qaid (PML-Q) Punjab Vice President Malik Ilyas Awan had demanded immediate removal of the security of the Ahmadiyya community.

The number of Ahmadiyya community in Pakistan is 40 lakhs

Let us tell you that the number of Ahmadiyya communities in Pakistan is about 4 million, but since 1974 by the Pakistani Constitution, the community has no right to call themselves Muslims, but they are considered infidels here. As a result, Ahmadis are not even allowed to call their prayer houses mosques, while the basic religious practices associated with Islam are forbidden to them.

(with language input)