Finland is scared of Russia's increasing shelling of Ukraine, the military chief said - if attacked then we are also ready for war

Finland is scared of Russia's increasing shelling of Ukraine, the military chief said - if attacked then we are also ready for war

The war between Russia and Ukraine is about to complete in four months. Meanwhile, Russia has intensified shelling to capture the Donbas region. On Wednesday, within a single day, Russia dropped seven missiles on the city of Mykolev. Given the intensity of the attack, Finland's military chief, General Timo Kivinen, has given a statement. He has said that if Russia attacks, we will enter the war with full force. He said that the people of Finland are ready to fight and we have prepared ammunition for the war.

Kivinen said Finland had made good military preparations since World War II. This country had two wars with Russia in the 1940s. Significantly, Russia and Finland share a border of 810 miles. Kivinen said that we have developed our military defense system in a better way. This is how it has been prepared so that we can fight a war like Ukraine. We have also kept more ammunition and air force ready for this. In the end, he said that Ukraine has so far proved to be a nuisance for Russia and we will prove to be the same for it.


Ukraine is confident that all 27 countries in Europe will support the candidacy for the EU
The statement of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky comes amid the ongoing war with Russia. He expressed hope that all 27 EU countries would support Ukraine's candidacy in the alliance. Significantly, a decision on Ukraine's EU candidacy could come by the end of this week. Zelensky said that this decision could prove to be the one to take us from darkness to light.

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Climate change is also having a negative effect on bees

Climate change is also having a negative effect on bees

A recent study has shown that changes in temperature have had a negative effect on new species of bumble bees over the past 120 years. These research findings have recently been published in Biology Letters.

Hannah Jackson, a postgraduate student in the M Gonigal Lab of Biology at Simon Fraser University, said on the study, "Bumble bees (Bumble bees) are important pollinators for wild plants and also for crops that humans depend on for food." We, therefore, need to develop conservation strategies that account for the future effects of climate change on bee populations.

Jackson and his colleagues in-depth analyzed existing datasets containing records on 46 bumblebee species in North America between 1900 and 2020. He made two models. First, on time and second on environmental factors. They found that six species of bumblebees decreased over time, while 22 increased and 18 remained stable, based on climate and land use.

The researchers noted that both temperature and precipitation increased between 1900 and 2020. on average in the period after the Industrial Revolution. Temperature change has mainly had a negative effect on bumble bees. 37 of the 46 species exhibited a greater decline than a change in temperature or a less positive increase in occupancy if the temperature remained constant. Importantly, nine species of bumble bee showed declines, which are associated with changing temperatures within their ranges. The team didn't find patterns in the other factors studied, such as rainfall and flower resources in which only one species declined.

In fact, both flower resources and rainfall had mixed results. About half of the bumblebee bee species were negatively affected by changes in rain flower resources, while the other half were positively affected. Therefore, the researchers conclude that changing temperatures are a major environmental factor that drives changes in bumble bee community composition. As bumble bee species vary in land use and future responses to climate change, says Jackson, conservation of these species should take precedence.

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