Russia captures small towns, aims to expand fighting in eastern Ukraine

Russia captures small towns, aims to expand fighting in eastern Ukraine

Kramatorsk (Ukraine). President Vladimir Putin on Saturday tried to defy European countries' resolve to punish Ukraine by imposing sanctions and supplying arms to Ukraine, amid Russian claims that it is moving towards its goal of capturing entire eastern Ukraine. The Russian Defense Ministry said a joint team of Russian troops and Kremlin-backed separatists had "completely" liberated the other small town of Liman. These separatists started fighting eight years ago in the Donbas, an industrial area adjacent to Russia.

Meanwhile, Ukraine's rail system has delivered weapons and evacuated people to Liman, an important rail hub in the east. The capture of Liman meant that the Russian army would have another breakthrough in the region. There are several bridges in this area for soldiers to cross the Siversky Donets River and transport military equipment. It is this river that has so far remained a hindrance for the Russian army to advance into the Donbas. Ukrainian officials had mixed reactions to Liman. Donetsk Governor Pavlo Kirilenko said on Friday that Russian troops had occupied most of its territory and were now trying to move towards Bakhmut, another city in the region.

However, on Saturday Ukraine's Deputy Defense Minister Hannah Myla denied Russia's claim that Liman had been captured. He said the fight is still going on. In a video address on Saturday, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky described the situation in the eastern region as "very complex". He said that the Russian army is trying to get some results by intensifying its efforts there. Meanwhile, the Kremlin said Putin held 80 minutes of phone conversations with the leaders of France and Germany on Saturday and warned them against continuing arms to Ukraine.

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Sri Lanka is facing an economic crisis and wants to buy oil from Russia, two ministers will visit Russia

Sri Lanka is facing an economic crisis and wants to buy oil from Russia, two ministers will visit Russia

Troubled Sri Lanka is exploring options to buy oil from Russia. A senior minister said on Sunday. Sri Lanka is desperate to replenish its dwindling fuel stocks amid an unprecedented economic crisis due to a severe shortage of foreign exchange reserves. On Sunday, the price of petrol was hiked by LKR 50 and diesel by LKR 60 respectively, which is the third price revision in two months.

State-owned refinery Ceylon Petroleum Corporation on Saturday informed the Sri Lankan government that the move was necessitated after the arrival of fuel shipments was delayed due to banking and logistical reasons. Given the dire scenario, Sri Lanka's Minister of Power and Energy Kanchana Wijesekera stressed that the government is exploring options to buy oil from Russia. He said, “We are looking for diplomatic channels. The last ship to arrive was a Russian ship."

Two ministers to visit Russia on Monday
Wijesekera said on Sunday that our first letter of credit was rejected by international banks because the ship was owned by a Russian company. He said the two ministers are scheduled to visit Russia on Monday to discuss fuel and other diplomatic matters. Let us tell you that last week, the Sri Lankan government approached several companies suggested by the Russian Embassy in Colombo for the purchase of crude oil.

"Meanwhile, the government has also decided to implement a token system for the supply of fuel to the people waiting in the queue at the filling station," Wijesekera said. The minister said, “This program will be implemented from Monday, for which the government has sought the help of the soldiers from the police and the army.”

shortage of essentials in Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka is facing the worst economic crisis since independence in 1948, due to which food, medicine, cooking gas, and fuel are being sold across the country. There has been a severe shortage of essential commodities like

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