Ukrainian citizens who escaped from Russia's attacks narrated their ordeal

Ukrainian citizens who escaped from Russia's attacks narrated their ordeal

Kyiv. Russian troops have stepped up attacks on the eastern Ukrainian cities of Svyarodonetsk and Lysikhansk. People who escaped from these areas say that since the last week the shelling has intensified, due to which they were not able to get out of the bomb anti-bomb centers built in the basement. Despite heavy Russian shelling, some fled these areas to Pokrovsk, 130 km south, and on Saturday left for western Ukraine on an evacuation train, which is far from the battlefield.

In the Luhansk region, fighting has intensified in the last important cities under Ukrainian control - Svyarodonetsk and Lysikhansk. The Donbas, made up of the Luhansk and Donetsk regions, is at the center of the Russian military's latest operation, which is considered the industrial center of eastern Ukraine. Moscow-backed separatists have been in control of a part of the Donbas for the past eight years and now the Russian army is trying to establish control over the whole of the Donbas. Yana Skakova's eyes were filled with tears as she somehow managed to escape with her 18-month-old baby in her lap amid the bombing. She narrated her ordeal that she was in the basement during the ongoing bombings and eventually came out with her 18-month-old and four-year-old sons, leaving behind her husband. Yana said that in the early days of the fighting, she used to get a chance to cook food on the street and let the children play outside, but the bombing has intensified over the past week.

He told that for the last five days people have not been able to come out of the basement at all. Yana said, “The situation there is very bad. It is very dangerous to come out." He said that on Friday, the police reached to rescue him from the basement, where 18 people, including nine children, were staying for the last two-and-a-half months. Yana said, “We were sitting there when the traffic police came and said that you should leave as soon as possible because it is not safe to live in Lysikansk now.”

He said that no one wanted to leave the city despite heavy bombardment and a lack of electricity, water, and gas. According to Yana, “we did not want to come from there, but had to leave for the sake of our children.” Oksana is 74 years old and her story is no different. She said that on Friday she was evacuated from Lasikhansk along with her 86-year-old husband by foreign volunteers. Seeing the uncertainty of the future, Oksana said, “I am going somewhere, but where, I do not know. Now I am a beggar who has no happiness. Now I have to live with help. It is better that I die.

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Sri Lanka is facing an economic crisis and wants to buy oil from Russia, two ministers will visit Russia

Sri Lanka is facing an economic crisis and wants to buy oil from Russia, two ministers will visit Russia

Troubled Sri Lanka is exploring options to buy oil from Russia. A senior minister said on Sunday. Sri Lanka is desperate to replenish its dwindling fuel stocks amid an unprecedented economic crisis due to a severe shortage of foreign exchange reserves. On Sunday, the price of petrol was hiked by LKR 50 and diesel by LKR 60 respectively, which is the third price revision in two months.

State-owned refinery Ceylon Petroleum Corporation on Saturday informed the Sri Lankan government that the move was necessitated after the arrival of fuel shipments was delayed due to banking and logistical reasons. Given the dire scenario, Sri Lanka's Minister of Power and Energy Kanchana Wijesekera stressed that the government is exploring options to buy oil from Russia. He said, “We are looking for diplomatic channels. The last ship to arrive was a Russian ship."

Two ministers to visit Russia on Monday
Wijesekera said on Sunday that our first letter of credit was rejected by international banks because the ship was owned by a Russian company. He said the two ministers are scheduled to visit Russia on Monday to discuss fuel and other diplomatic matters. Let us tell you that last week, the Sri Lankan government approached several companies suggested by the Russian Embassy in Colombo for the purchase of crude oil.

"Meanwhile, the government has also decided to implement a token system for the supply of fuel to the people waiting in the queue at the filling station," Wijesekera said. The minister said, “This program will be implemented from Monday, for which the government has sought the help of the soldiers from the police and the army.”

shortage of essentials in Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka is facing the worst economic crisis since independence in 1948, due to which food, medicine, cooking gas, and fuel are being sold across the country. There has been a severe shortage of essential commodities like

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